Connecticut Clearinghouse
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  SitemapContact Information
HomeTopicsResourcesNews / EventsResource / Library CatalogLinksRegistration Forms

Cultural Competency

Cultural competence refers to a set of academic and interpersonal skills that allow individuals to increase their understanding and appreciation of cultural differences and similarities within, among, and between groups. Read More ›

Cultural competence refers to a set of academic and interpersonal skills that allow individuals to increase their understanding and appreciation of cultural differences and similarities within, among, and between groups. This requires a willingness and ability to draw on community-based values, traditions, and customs and to work with knowledgeable persons of and from the community in developing targeted interventions, communications, and other supports.

A culturally competent program is one that demonstrates sensitivity to and understanding of cultural differences in program design, implementation, and evaluation. Culturally competent programs:

  • Acknowledge culture as a predominant force in shaping behaviors, values, and institutions
  • Acknowledge and accept that cultural differences exist and have an impact on service delivery  
  • Believe that diversity within cultures is as important as diversity between cultures  
  • Respect the unique, culturally defined needs of various client populations  
  • Recognize that concepts such as "family" and "community" are different for various cultures and even for subgroups within cultures  
  • Understand that people from different racial and ethnic groups and other cultural subgroups are usually best served by persons who are a part of or in tune with their culture  
  • Recognize that taking the best of both worlds enhances the capacity of all. 

A culturally competent program is one that demonstrates sensitivity to and understanding of cultural differences in program design, implementation, and evaluation. Culturally competent programs:

  • Acknowledge culture as a predominant force in shaping behaviors, values, and institutions  
  • Acknowledge and accept that cultural differences exist and have an impact on service delivery  
  • Believe that diversity within cultures is as important as diversity between cultures  
  • Respect the unique, culturally defined needs of various client populations  
  • Recognize that concepts such as "family" and "community" are different for various cultures and even for subgroups within cultures  
  • Understand that people from different racial and ethnic groups and other cultural subgroups are usually best served by persons who are a part of or in tune with their culture  
  • Recognize that taking the best of both worlds enhances the capacity of all. 

Source:  SAMHSA's National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI)  

Web Solutions Connecticut CT Web Design & Development CompanyWheeler Clinic